Living in Lithuania

Newsletter subscription

Get hot news about studies in Lithuania straight to your inbox. Register for the newsletter right now.

Food and shops

Print

Food and drinks 

Do you consider yourself a real gastronome? The network of cafés and restaurants is well developed in Lithuania. You can choose from establishments offering traditional Lithuanian dishes in a folk environment (see picture bellow of a restaurant in Vilnius), pizzerias attracting customers with their wonderful smells, little Japanese restaurants who closely guard their cuisine secrets, and fast food bistros. Students can have a meal in the university canteens that offer a daily lunch especially for them.

If you like cooking, you’ll be able to buy food and drinks in the large supermarkets Maxima, Rimi and Iki or you could look for it in the smaller more specialised shops. If you want more variety, go to the market. The biggest markets are in Vilnius, be sure to check out Halės, Kalvarijų, or Šeškinės markets. In Kaunas you can visit the Stoties and Šilainių markets, and in Klaipeda, Naujasis, Senasis, and Tilžės markets. 

If you go in for a healthier lifestyle, you can find the products you need in farmers’ markets where a large variety of organic products are on offer. You can find fresh vegetables or free-range chickens, along with other natural delights. Such markets are always in special areas in the large cities and may only be held at certain times (for example, once or twice in a week) so keep on the lookout for details. However, there are also mobile farmers’ markets.

Supermarkets

Although Lithuania does not have a huge population, it has a large number of supermarkets. They are modern in every respect and compare favourably with any of the supermarkets in other European cities. In our supermarkets you will not only be able to do all your shopping, but also have lunch, meet friends, go to the cinema or have a relaxing massage.

Vilnius has recently become a great place for people who like shopping as a large number of supermarkets and malls have opened. Akropolis (a network of Lithuanian supermarkets) is one of these and is really worth a visit because there are a lot of shops and restaurants in one place and also an ice rink, bowling alley and cinemas. People come from miles around to do their shopping here.

The Helios City supermarket also offers shopping and places to have lunch or just enjoy a cup of coffee. Situated on two floors, there is a supermarket, cafés, smaller shops, beauty salons, and a drycleaners. Other supermarket centres in the capital city are Europa, Panorama, BIG, and Ozas. 

Gariūnai, which is situated on the outskirts of Vilnius, is the largest open air market in the Baltic States. Sellers come to this market not only from Lithuania, but from Ukraine as well. In this market, they say you can buy just about anything including clothes, footwear, records, and even software. However, you need to be cautious; while the products here are cheap, they are not always of good quality.

Kaunas is also a city of quality supermarkets and malls: you can walk along Laisve Boulevard, the attractive, tree-lined pedestrian street with rows of shops on either side. The biggest supermarkets in the city are Akropolis, Mega, Molas, Savas, HyperMaxima and the Urmas trading area.

People from Latvia and the Kaliningrad area come to Klaipeda to shop. Shoppers come by cruise ships because they can find products of good quality at a reasonable price. Also, there are several supermarkets, including Akropolis, Arena and BIG.

Worth knowing:

By law, shops are prohibited from selling alcohol from 10pm until 8am (the exceptions are bars, cafés and restaurants).

You can buy food every day from 8am until 10pm.

Other shops usually open at 10am and close at between 6 - 8pm. Some do not open on Sundays.

Museums and galleries are closed one day a week, usually on Sunday or Monday.

Smoking is prohibited in restaurants, cafés, bars and other public premises unless they are equipped with special places for smoking (the smoking area is inside in most night clubs).

In most places in Lithuania you can drink tap water without any fear. Mineral water can be bought in the shops, cafés, and restaurants. The most famous Lithuanian mineral water is Vytautas.

In Lithuanian restaurants you will be greeted with a good atmosphere and tasty food. In addition, the food is cheaper here in comparison with other Baltic States. Wine or strong alcoholic drinks are the most expensive but you can always select a cheaper alternative. We highly recommend tasting the local beer, the most popular trademarks of which are Švyturys, Utenos alus, and Kalnapilis.

Those who like different cuisines can choose from a large variety of restaurants that follow the cooking traditions of different countries, e.g. Italian, Argentinean, Armenian, Chinese, Hungarian, Russian, Indian, etc. 

Image from Banlon1964 and jo.sau used under Creative Commons License

Local information

18:40
-1 °C -3 °C

Student experience